Rabanada (Brazilian French Toast)

Good morning!!  Welcome to my first post of this year’s Christmas series. If you remember, last year I shared recipes that went with a Christmas movies theme. (If you don’t remember, you can check it out riiiiggggght here. See the individual recipe posts in the “Ping Back” section at the end.)

This year, I decided to go back to the roots of my blog and explore Christmas Around the World. I did a little research and found some fun Christmas recipes that are considered traditional in other parts of the world. I gotta say, the more I researched for this and decided what to make, the more excited I got! I hope you enjoy this theme as much as I do.

For the first recipe, I chose Rabanada, which is a Brazilian-style French Toast. At first I was thinking it would just be like any other french toast, but I can assure you it is not. This is seriously next level french toast! It is really easy to make and it tastes amazing. This is a breakfast table game changer.

French toast goes back really far in history, to the 4th and 5th centuries even. It is sometimes referred to as “Poor Man’s Toast” because it is used as a way to not waste stale bread. Many different countries have their own version. Rabanadas are popular in Brazil for special holidays, like Christmas and New Years, although they are typically eaten as a dessert rather than breakfast. These are so good though, I can’t see why they can’t be made all year round anytime of the day! They are fried, so they are perfectly crisp on the outside and nice and soft on the inside from soaking in the custard overnight. It’s almost like a churro!

When searching for recipes, I learned that there is a basic way to make these, and everyone has their own way. I took that as license to run with it! I hope you like it as much as my family did!

Rabanadas (Brazilian French Toast)

1 French Baguette (use the skinnier baguette, not the big one)
2 eggs
1 can sweetened condensed milk
1-1/2 cans regular milk (use the empty sweetened condensed milk can)
splash of vanilla
pinch of salt
vegetable oil, for frying
1 cup sugar
a couple tablespoons cinnamon

Slice the bread on a bias (at an angle) into about 1 inch-thick pieces. If the bread is fresh, leave it out to get stale. If it’s already stale, then congratulations. You are one step ahead!


In a 9×13 baking dish, whisk together the eggs, sweetened condensed milk, regular milk, vaniila, and salt. Add the bread and turn over to coat in the custard mixture. Put in the fridge to sit about 4 hours or overnight. It’s easiest to just do it the night before. Who wants to get up that early?


When ready to make the rabanadas, heat enough oil in your skillet to come about halfway up the slice of bread. Let it come to about 325 degrees.

Take the bread out of the custard and let the excess mixture drip off. Add to the hot oil. You’ll probably need to do this in batches to not crowd the pan. I think I was able to do about 5 or 6 in each batch.


Fry on each side for about 4 or 5 minutes, until golden brown. This will give you a nice crunchy outside and soft inside.

While the bread is frying, mix together your cinnamon and sugar in a shallow bowl or pie plate. I eyeballed this and it really all depends on how much cinnamon you like. If you like it really cinnamony, add a lot. If you just want a hint of cinnamon, add a little.

When they are done, remove them to a paper towel-lined plate. Then, while they are still hot, dredge them in the cinnamon-sugar mixture. After this step, they will look an awful lot like a churro. Not that there’s anything wrong with that! :0)


Now, serve them up and watch them disappear fast!

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